howbadweneedeachother:

This killed me

howbadweneedeachother:

This killed me

(via sleepybulltoad)



vintagedudes:

Patrick Swayze and James Read in the other North & South.

vintagedudes:

Patrick Swayze and James Read in the other North & South.


andrewhickeywriter:

I’ve decided that since many of the people I know on Tumblr are Monkees fans, I’m going to do a Monkees Song Of The Day. I’m going to go through all the Monkees’ songs, at least those on Spotify, and post the relevant entry from my book about the band’s music. If you want to buy the book, it. and my other books, can be found at http://www.amazon.com/Andrew-Hickey/e/B0057GM3KW

Pleasant Valley Sunday
Writers: Gerry Goffin and Carole King
Lead Vocalist: Micky Dolenz
Other Monkees present: Peter Tork (piano), Michael Nesmith (guitar and backing vocals), Davy Jones (backing vocals and percussion)


If ever proof were needed that the Monkees were capable of producing great pop records without the involvement of Don Kirshner, this is it.
With an instrumental track by Tork, Nesmith, Douglas and Hoh (with additional acoustic guitar by Bill Chadwick and possibly Dolenz), this shows that the band could, when left to their own devices, create spectacular pop singles.
Every band member gets to shine here - Dolenz of course takes the lead vocal, and does his usual superb job, Nesmith plays the Day Tripper-esque guitar riff (composed by Chip Douglas) and adds harmonies (and the Dolenz/Nesmith harmony blend, while underutilised, is one of the band’s most thrilling elements), Tork adds the piano part under the middle eight (which otherwise would have seemed woefully poor, having as it does only a single chord), and Jones gives the vocal performance of his life, on the nasal, sarcastic `ta ta ta ta’ section.
Given that the song itself is relatively weak, being just an example of the mid-60s tendency to cruelly mock people for daring to want a comfortable life (see for example every song George Harrison ever wrote), the power of the track must be attributed entirely to the performance, production and arrangement. And every element here is spot-on (as can be heard on the `karaoke’ version made available on a Japanese best-of CD, where every detail of the backing track can be heard).
It’s not the song itself that made this a hit, but Douglas’ riff and the understanding of dynamics. This track builds from a relatively sedate beginning towards an almost orgasmic peak, with the riff and Nesmith and Dolenz’s wailing being lost in a wall of reverb that in turn gets fed back on itself. The ending wouldn’t be out of place on a Led Zeppelin record, but because it’s been contextualised as part of a piece of simple pop music, no-one blinked an eye.
Quite rightly, this is a favourite of the band members - Peter Tork recorded a truly odd remake of it with his band The New Monks in 1980, for example - because of all their classic singles, it’s the only one which allowed them all to shine as a group.


andrewhickeywriter:

I’ve decided that since many of the people I know on Tumblr are Monkees fans, I’m going to do a Monkees Song Of The Day. I’m going to go through all the Monkees’ songs, at least those on Spotify, and post the relevant entry from my book about the band’s music. If you want to buy the book, it. and my other books, can be found at http://www.amazon.com/Andrew-Hickey/e/B0057GM3KW

You Just May Be the One

Writer: Michael Nesmith

Lead Vocalist: Michael Nesmith

Another full-group performance, this time with Tork on bass (double-tracked, with one bass sounding like a Danelectro bass — a trick Nesmith had used to give a country sound to several of his recordings over the previous year) this Nesmith song had originally been recorded with members of the Wrecking Crew and used in the TV show (that version is on The Monkees deluxe edition).

A catchy Beatlesque pop song, this is full of hooks, from the two extra beats dropped into the first line of the verses (which can be broken down into a bar of four, a bar of six and a bar of four), to the way the instruments drop out for the start of the title line, to the way the backing vocals all hold the same high note on the middle eight while the lead vocal descends down the scale.

Had there not been a de facto ban by the record label on releasing singles with a lead vocal by anyone other than Dolenz or Jones, this would have been an obvious hit single. Written by Nesmith before the Monkees formed, it manages perfectly to straddle the boundaries between country music and jangly powerpop in a way that few others could, pointing the way forward to bands like Big Star or mid-period REM, but with a lighter touch. Sublime.


Decided to repurpose the buttons I got at the tour last week as Christmas ornaments for my tree. 

monkee christmas to all and to all a good night

The Monkees, Beacon Theatre

December 2, 2012

monkees mike nesmith peter tork micky dolenz beacon theatre

Some post-Sandy damage in my neighborhood, Jersey City, NJ. The Hudson River swelled over and flooded much of the waterfront area, and came several blocks inland. People are still without power and flushing out basements (my block was very lucky - only out a day and a half), though Hoboken, the next city to the north, got hit much, much worse. The sign at the end is from the local Synergy gym, and sums it all up perfectly.

jersey city sandy newport new jersey storm damage


I always loved that the “tall tower” was the Empire State Building.

monkees fairy tale peter peasant of tork NYC